Marvel Almost Sold The Movie Rights To Nearly All Their Characters To SONY For $25 Million

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No, you didn’t read that wrong, the headline of this article is in fact factual. Ahead of the release of Black Panther, let us take a look back to a point in time where Marvel wasn’t at the top of modern filmmaking and was just coming out of bankruptcy. In 1998 Marvel sold the movie rights to Spider-Man for a mere $10 million which today would be seen as highway robbery. But that’s not the entirety of the story.

We all know the story, in the 90s Marvel was struggling heavily and in a desperate move to get some quick cash, the comic giant decided to sell off some of the rights to their most popular characters. That peaked the interest of Sony, who then enlisted executive Yair Landau to acquire the rights to Spider-Man.

Then-Marvel chief Ike Perlmutter saw an opportunity, if Sony wanted Spidey then maybe he could dump the rest of the characters too. He offered the movie rights to almost all of Marvel’s characters to Sony for $25 million. Landau went back to his bosses with the offer to which they promptly said no. They only wanted Spider-Man, the other characters were more or less worthless at the time.

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That led to Spider-Man being sold for only $10 million. Sony then went on to make two separate franchises with the character that grossed a couple billion dollars. That was until current Marvel Studios head Kevin Feige decided he wanted Peter Parker in the MCU and went after him the summer of 2014.

Following the lackluster box office of Amazing Spider-Man 2, Feige saw an open window to cut a deal with Sony to have Spider-Man involved in the most successful franchise of films. He went to Sony motion picture Amy Pascal about the idea to which Pascal replied: “get the f— out.” Obviously, that didn’t stop Feige and you can catch Spider-Man in the upcoming Avengers: Infinity War.

What do you think a Sony made MCU would have looked like? Let us know in the comments below! –Jackson Hayes

Source: The Wall Street Journal

 

 

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